Couple who moved into school bus save money by eating out of DUMPSTERS

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    A couple who moved into a school bus has revealed how they save thousands of dollars a month by scrounging for food in dumpsters.<br>Leah, 30, and Oak Greerslanian, 33, from Bradenton, , and Sacramento, , decided in 2018 that they wanted to get out and see the world together, so they bought an old school bus for $3,200.<br>The couple – who met during a year-long biking tour of the U.S.

    – worked together to convert the bus into the perfect mobile home while living in a tent on a friend’s property, spending about $17,000 on the project.<br>They eventually moved into the bus, and they now spend their time traveling across America in it, while dumpster diving for food – which they said saves them more than $2,500 a month.<br>The pair looks for dumpsters located near supermarkets, and collects ‘expired’ foods that have been thrown away by the grocery stores.<br>They have found things like cold cuts, milk, cheese, and eggs in the trash, and sometimes, they get so much food through their dumpster diving that it can’t even fit in their mobile home. <br> A couple who moved into a school bus reveals how they save thousands of dollars a month by eating out of dumpsters<br> Leah, 30, and Oak Greerslanian, 33, decided in 2018 that they wanted to get out and see the world together, so they bought an old school bus for $3,200<br> The couple worked together to convert the bus into the perfect mobile home while living in a tent on a friend’s property, spending about $17,000 on the project<br> They eventually moved into the bus, and they now spend their time traveling across America in it, while dumpster diving for food – which they said saves them more than $2,500 a month<br> ‘It’s hard to say what the best haul we’ve had was,’ said Leah.

    ‘One of the best ones off the top of my head is one time we pulled up to a store and saw the employee dumping lots of full cardboard boxes into the dumpster and when he was finished he just turned around, closed the door and never looked back.<br>’We immediately went to check it out and there were cases full of still super cold bacon, cold cuts, milk, feta, cheese and eggs.<br>’We just barely had enough storage for it all but made it work and ate a pound or two of bacon a day for about two weeks, it was great.<br>’The more you look, the more you find.

    We usually gather produce and things to resell or donate.<br>’Being in a tiny home there is limited space, but we always make room for the good food.'<br>Sometimes the pair are spotted as they ‘dive’ – and they said they get mixed reactions to their unique method of shopping.<br>Leah admitted: ‘Most of the time they ask you to leave.
    Sometimes they are really nice and just say don’t make a mess please.<br>’The other day I got yelled at by a guy because he thought I was throwing trash into his bin.<br> RELATED ARTICLES

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    The pair looks for dumpsters located near supermarkets, and collects ‘expired’ foods that have been thrown away by the grocery stores<br>patch.com They have found things like cold cuts, milk, cheese, and eggs in the trash, and sometimes, they get so much food through their dumpster diving that it can’t even fit in their mobile home<br> ‘Being in a tiny home there is limited space, but we always make room for the good food,’ said Leah.

    Oak is pictured outside the bus<br> Sometimes the pair are spotted as they ‘dive’ – and they said they get mixed reactions to their unique method of shopping.

    Oak is pictured dumpster diving<br> Leah, who was previously a waxologist, and Oak, who worked on a farm, also saved money by trying to use as many second-hand items as they could to furnish the bus<br>’I was like, “No, I’m looking for good stuff to take out!” It is illegal to throw away but not to take stuff out unless it says “no trespassing.”‘<br>Leah, who was previously a waxologist, and Oak, who worked on a farm, also saved money by trying to use as many second-hand items as they could to furnish the bus.<br> When they’re on the road, they admitted that the cost can add up, since they have to spend a lot of money on gas<br>When they’re on the road, they admitted that the cost can add up, since they have to spend a lot of money on gas.<br>But when they’re not traveling, the couple – who park on a friend’s property in Florida – said the cost of living is next to nothing, especially since they are saving on not having to go shopping for food and not having to pay rent on an apartment For rent Floridablanca.<br>’We bought our bus in 2018 and paid around $3,200 for a mid-sized school bus with seats still in it,’ Leah revealed.<br>’We have done the whole conversion ourselves and it’s an ever evolving art project and labor of love.<br>’It cost roughly $17,000 for build out and bus.

    We did a ton of thrifting and second hand searching and buying so as to not have to spend an exuberant amount on new stuff.<br>’The cost of living this way depends on if you’re stationary or travelling. Overall for us, it is much more affordable and enjoyable to live this way.<br> When they’re not traveling, the couple – who park on a friend’s property – said the cost of living is next to nothing, especially since they are saving on not having to go shopping for food<br> ‘Overall for us, it is much more affordable and enjoyable to live this way,’ revealed Leah.

    Some of the food they discovered in a dumpster is pictured<br> The couple’s expenses, aside from gas, boil down to just two things – phone bills and auto insurance<br>’Right now we are staying stationary on a friend’s property in Florida, and have very little overhead cost.<br>’But, we did do two cross-country tours in the bus last year and that was major cha-chings in diesel and as always with an older vehicle, possible breakdowns.<br> Leah and Oak both grew up in middle-class households, and explained that originally, their friends and families didn’t understand why they decided to live the way they do<br>’Sacramento rent, being outside of San Francisco, is always getting higher.

    It’s nearly $2,000 now for a mediocre apartment. The same goes for the gulf coast areas of Florida we are in now.<br>’Our bus gets around 10 miles per gallon with a tank the size of about 30 gallons. We would have to fill up every day and give it about $100+ each time.<br>’When we left Florida in 2021 the price was around $2.99 and by the time we made it to California it was up to $4.83 per gallon. Now it is $5.19 a gallon here in Florida.'<br>The couple’s expenses, aside from gas, boil down to just two things – phone bills and auto insurance, which Leah said they pay yearly in lump sums; the phones cost them $720 a year, and the insurance is $600 a year.<br>Leah and Oak both grew up in middle-class households, and explained that originally, their friends and families didn’t understand why they decided to live the way they do – calling them names like ‘homeless’ and ‘crazy.'<br>But now, they are supportive, after seeing how positive the lifestyle has been for them.<br>’They thought we were crazy and going to be “living in the woods like the homeless,”‘ said Leah.<br> They said their loved ones called them names like ‘homeless’ and ‘crazy’ at first, but now, they are supportive. Some of the food they discovered during dumpster diving is pictured<br> The couple added that the benefits of their lifestyle include having more freedom and the chance to learn more about the world<br>’Now they think it’s brilliant and definitely see the bright side of things and are happy for us.<br>’With dumpster diving, mostly people are shocked to learn that such beautiful foods are being tossed, and at alarming rates.<br>’One person I know says, “Why don’t you just grow your own?” and we laugh.

    We have grown our own food.<br>’It’s a lot of work, this is already grown and ready to eat and save from the landfill.'<br>The couple added that the benefits of their lifestyle include having more freedom and the chance to learn more about the world.<br>’I love being able to explore all the opportunities the world has to offer,’ gushed Leah.<br>’Also, I love to forage, foray, and learn about the flora and fauna in new areas.

    I love all the plants and animals we get to learn about.<br>’The main benefit of dumpster diving is free food, of course. We both love to eat and cook so a surplus of food makes for a great time in the kitchen – we are always trying new recipes.<br>’The biggest benefit to the earth is the reduction of food being thrown into the landfill, and in turn creating methane.'<br>

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